Charles Arnoldi

The evolution of Arnoldi's works is seen as the intricate stick paintings and wood reliefs of his early years, find themselves further abstracted through his use of color, line and form.  Upon viewing works by Jackson Pollock and William de Kooning as a young man in New York, Charles Arnoldi felt compelled to paint, inspired by the abstracted and imperfect lines and details of these great artists.

SAN FRANCISCO

UNION SQUARE

 

341 Sutter Street
San Francisco, California 94108

Monday - Saturday, 11am - 5pm

Sunday by appointment 

415.392.2299

ST. HELENA

NAPA VALLEY

 

1328 Main Street
St. Helena, California 94574

Monday - Saturday, 10am - 5pm

Sunday 11am - 5pm

707.200.5050

MONTECITO

SANTA BARBARA

 

1266 Coast Village Road
Santa Barbara, California 93108

Monday, Thursday - Saturday, 10am - 5pm

Sunday, 11am - 5pm

Tuesday - Wednesday by Appointment

805.770.7170

Copyright 2020 Caldwell Snyder Gallery

All rights reserved.

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Biography

Arnoldi’s work speaks parenthetically. His curved lines envelop the idea of formalist construction, while simultaneously projecting the idea outward to the viewer for further introspection. We are confronted by his clever use of color and movement. Although simplistic in form, these complex concepts are only successful visually when executed by the most experienced of painters.

For over thirty years Arnoldi has dealt with the interplay of these ideas in art. He began these pursuits scholastically at first, but quickly abandoned these teaching methods in favor of his own inspiration. Playing outsider did get him in the door of many prominent collections including The Art Institute of Chicago, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

His work hangs theoretically next to the likes of Mark Rothko or Piet Mondrain, but stands alone in its unique attention to detail. His fields of color are accented with thoughtful visual interruptions. Shades of grey poke through iris blue, grape hides beneath a sheet of turquoise. These gestures help to qualify the grander concepts behind simplicity, known in art as modernity.

While his paintings do attempt to explain, they leave the bigger picture up to the viewer. We are confronted with an intricate web of puzzle pieces, finely crafted into one total work of art. Our minds can envision the pulling and pushing of these parts, a testament to the ongoing struggle of getting comfortable in the web of modern art—challenging, intricate and beautiful.

Born
1946 Dayton, Ohio.

Education
1968 Attended Chouinard Art Institute, Los Angeles, CA.

Awards
1982 Maestro Fellowship, California Arts Council
Artist Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts
1975 John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship
1974 Artist Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts
1972 Wittkowsky Award, Art Institute of Chicago
1969 Young Talent Award, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Contemporary Arts Council

Public Collections
Arthur Anderson, Chicago, Illinois. • Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York • Bank of America, San Francisco, California. • Chase Manhattan Bank, New York, New York • Chicago Art Institute, Chicago, Illinois • The Contemporary Museum, Honolulu, Hawaii • Continental National Bank, Fort Worth, Texas • Dellen Publishing, Santa Clara, California • Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado • First International Bank, Houston, Texas • First Interstate Bank, Las Vegas, Nevada • Frito-Lay, Dallas, Texas • Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Los Angeles, California • Guggenheim Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain • Hallmark Cards, Kansas City, Missouri • Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey • J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky • JMB Reality, Chicago, Illinois • Hughes Corporation, Los Angeles, California • Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, Missouri • Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California • Menil Foundation, Houston, Texas • Memphis Brooks Museum, Memphis, Tennessee • Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York • Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin • Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL • Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas • Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York • National Gallery of Art, Sydney, Australia • Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri • The Newark Museum, Newark, New Jersey • The Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena, CA • Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, California • Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, California • Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon • Rayovac Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin • San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego, California • San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California • Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, California • Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, Washington • Security Pacific National Bank, Los Angeles, California • Southland Corporation, Dallas, Texas
• Southwestern Bell, St. Louis, Missouri • United Energy Resources, Houston, Texas

Press

PRESS

Selected Artworks

Born
1946 Dayton, Ohio.

Education
1968 Attended Chouinard Art Institute, Los Angeles, CA.

Awards
1982 Maestro Fellowship, California Arts Council
Artist Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts
1975 John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship
1974 Artist Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts
1972 Wittkowsky Award, Art Institute of Chicago
1969 Young Talent Award, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Contemporary Arts Council

Public Collections
Arthur Anderson, Chicago, Illinois. • Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York • Bank of America, San Francisco, California. • Chase Manhattan Bank, New York, New York • Chicago Art Institute, Chicago, Illinois • The Contemporary Museum, Honolulu, Hawaii • Continental National Bank, Fort Worth, Texas • Dellen Publishing, Santa Clara, California • Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado • First International Bank, Houston, Texas • First Interstate Bank, Las Vegas, Nevada • Frito-Lay, Dallas, Texas • Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Los Angeles, California • Guggenheim Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain • Hallmark Cards, Kansas City, Missouri • Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey • J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, Kentucky • JMB Reality, Chicago, Illinois • Hughes Corporation, Los Angeles, California • Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, Missouri • Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California • Menil Foundation, Houston, Texas • Memphis Brooks Museum, Memphis, Tennessee • Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York • Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin • Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL • Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas • Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York • National Gallery of Art, Sydney, Australia • Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri • The Newark Museum, Newark, New Jersey • The Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena, CA • Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, California • Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, California • Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon • Rayovac Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin • San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego, California • San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, California • Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, California • Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, Washington • Security Pacific National Bank, Los Angeles, California • Southland Corporation, Dallas, Texas
• Southwestern Bell, St. Louis, Missouri • United Energy Resources, Houston, Texas

Biography

Arnoldi’s work speaks parenthetically. His curved lines envelop the idea of formalist construction, while simultaneously projecting the idea outward to the viewer for further introspection. We are confronted by his clever use of color and movement. Although simplistic in form, these complex concepts are only successful visually when executed by the most experienced of painters.

For over thirty years Arnoldi has dealt with the interplay of these ideas in art. He began these pursuits scholastically at first, but quickly abandoned these teaching methods in favor of his own inspiration. Playing outsider did get him in the door of many prominent collections including The Art Institute of Chicago, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

His work hangs theoretically next to the likes of Mark Rothko or Piet Mondrain, but stands alone in its unique attention to detail. His fields of color are accented with thoughtful visual interruptions. Shades of grey poke through iris blue, grape hides beneath a sheet of turquoise. These gestures help to qualify the grander concepts behind simplicity, known in art as modernity.

While his paintings do attempt to explain, they leave the bigger picture up to the viewer. We are confronted with an intricate web of puzzle pieces, finely crafted into one total work of art. Our minds can envision the pulling and pushing of these parts, a testament to the ongoing struggle of getting comfortable in the web of modern art—challenging, intricate and beautiful.