Montoya & Ortiz

The partnership of Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz explores both the figure and common elements found in nature. Through their sculptural guidance and subtle changes in scale the viewer ponders what makes color and form a visual feast. What makes the shell of a shrimp or an egg so compelling or why is a stuffed olive so rich in color and shape? Why is the incongruous pairing of a colossal pepper held by the figure of a seemingly fragile man straining under the weight of nature's abundance cause for contemplation? The answer lies in the exploration of the innate elegance of familiar forms.

Biography

Luis and Leslie’s recent bronzes, as beautiful as ever, are strictly faithful representations of a marine fauna of mollusks, seashells, snails, clams, shrimps, prawns, and other crustaceans. Are we before another of Borges’ Pierre Menards re-writing Don Quixote word by word exactly as the original creator wrote it? Or are we now, as I believe, in the other end of the spectrum? At a place where we have life reverting back to the mineral world. A world of slimy primordial life secreting saliva of calcium carbonate yearning to go back to our metallic origins; billions of years of clams discarding skeletons to add one more layer of limestone and lift one more mountain range; or a coral adding one more branch to surface an island in the middle of the ocean. In the Universe form is in a constant flow of changes and transmutations: rocks melt and liquids solidify; light becomes matter, matter reverts light; life petrifies time, and time becomes rock to become life again billions of years later. A petrified forest is a calendar, but it was a cascade of light and water before, or as the Mexican poet Octavio Paz saw it, the agave is water and its thorns imitate the sea urchin and both are time petrified. Creation is an eternal close cycle of life, matter, and time. And the artists have seen that the sullen persistent mollusk that stubbornly ponders its geometry lesson of secreted coils or the spiral curves generated on a sea snail came up—billions of years before the Greeks – with the mathematical equation that graphs the tides, the movement of the waves or the orbits of the galaxies. Charting their helicoidal graphs, the mollusks found the formula to petrify time, to give it plastic consistency.

With their new bronzes, these two artists, perhaps unconsciously, are expanding the conceptual core that sustains their work. If in their vegetable universe metal and colors were perceived as luscious soft flesh, in their current work, the hidden defenseless animal has learned how to encapsulate itself with protective shells and metallic plates very much like our old Venetian friend Bartolomeo Colleoni. The inter-textual relationship that the bronze Birth of Venus (2005) establishes with Botticcelli’s masterpiece at the Uffizi is perhaps the best illustration of all this in the questions it opens. In the painting the sensual naked body of the goddess is as if the mollusk where she stands had encapsulated her, layer after layer of mother-of-pearl into a beautiful crystal of organic origin: a pearl. It brought to the world the light of human reason and pagan love. In the bronze sculpture we are discussing, the closed clams recall that the same gestation could be taking place. That the clam is ready to bloom into a lustful goddess. Or has the process somehow gone terribly wrong? The larger clam stands in a precarious balance upon the smaller clam. Has Venus returned to its original form? Are the valves the protective plates of something our times could not nourish? The clams are as lustful, if not more than the soft skin of the goddess of love. Is there irony or an obscene pun in all this? There are many linguistic connotations that come to mind. And perhaps all their bronzes are also metaphors for sculpture itself. Many more questions could be asked. Isn’t that the main function of art? To conclude, it is obvious that Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz have undergone an inner journey of reflection, reassessment and transformation of an art form they know very well. At this stage of their evolution they have discovered that time is not a frontal attack on the human spirit; something that we can abolish or should fight back by adding more plates to our protective armor. Creation is not an open-ended process, but an infinite cycle of transformations and time is the engine that allows the whole process to keep on going.

Leslie Ortiz


Education

Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten

Boston University, School for the Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, BFA Magna Cum Laude in sculpture.


Awards

The F.C.Uriot Prize, Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam, Holland. Awarded tuition and workshop fellowships, and The Laura Goldenberg Memorial Scholarship, Boston University.


Luis Montoya

Education

School of Fine Arts of San Fernando, Madrid, Spain, BFA, MFA.

Castellblach Foundation Independent Study in Florence, London, New York.

Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, Post-graduate studies in sculpture.


Awards

1991  33rd Annual Hortt Memorial Competition, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

1986  28th Annual Hortt Memorial Competition, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

1976  James J. Akston Foundation Award.

1971  Francisco Alcantra Award, Spain.


Special Commissions

1999 The Society of Four Arts, Palm Beach, FL

1994 Palm Beach International Airport, West Palm Beach, FL

           Esperante Building, West Palm Beach, FL

1993 Tokyo/Fuji Art Museum Tokyo, Japan

1991 Sofia University, Tokyo, Japan

1990 Forest Ridge, Fort Lauderdale, FL

1989 Phillips Point, West Palm Beach, FL


Public Collections

National Museum of Sculpture, Valladolid, Spain

Circle of Fine Arts, Madrid, Spain

Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL

Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL

The Society of Four Arts, Palm Beach, FL

Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, Green Bay, WI

Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Art, Racine, WI


Selected Exhibitions

2019 Art Market San Francisco, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

           SCOPE Miami, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

           Caldwell Snyder Gallery, St. Helena

2018 35th Anniversary Show, Caldwell Snyder Gallery, San Francisco

2018 Caldwell Snyder Gallery, St. Helena, CA

2014 Caldwell Snyder Gallery, St. Helena, CA

2009 Art Miami, Caldwell Snyder Gallery, Miami, FL

2007 Caldwell Snyder Gallery, St. Helena, CA

           Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, FL

2005 Caldwell Snyder Gallery, San Francisco, CA

           Trajan Gallery, Carmel, CA

2004 Edgewood Orchard Gallery, Fish Creek, WI

           Hawk Gallery, Columbus, OH

           Caldwell Snyder Gallery, San Francisco, CA

           Trajan Gallery, Carmel, CA

           Gerald Peters Fine Art, Dallas, TX

           Galerie Guillon-Laffaille, Paris, France

2003 SOFA Chicago, Hawk Gallery, Columbus, OH

           Hooks-Epstein Galleries, Houston, TX

           Ameringer & Yohe Fine Art, Boca Raton, FL

           San Francisco Art Fair, Caldwell Snyder, San Francisco, CA

           ARTPalm Beach, Ameringer & Yohe Fine Art, Boca Raton, FL

           San Francisco Art Fair, Caldwell Snyder, San Francisco, CA

           ARTChicago, Waddington & Tribby, Boca Raton, FL

2002 ARTMiami, Waddinton & Tribby, Boca Raton, FL

           Pillsbury Peters Fine Art, Dallas, TX

           ARTPalm Beach, Waddington & Tribby, Boca Raton, FL

           Caldwell Snyder Gallery, San Francisco, CA

2001 Gallery Henoch, New York, NY

           Waddington & Tribby, Boca Raton, FL

Press

PRESS

Selected Artworks

Cherry Bucket II

Cherry Bucket II

Bronze

25.5 x 13 x 12 inches

210031

All Aboard

All Aboard

Bronze

16.5 x 40 x 19 inches

190425

Silver Canister with Black & Red

Silver Canister with Black & Red

Bronze

20 x 11 x 8.5 inches

190423

Honeydew Slice

Honeydew Slice

Bronze

15 x 35.5 x 8.75 inches

190420

Cesta de Setas

Cesta de Setas

Bronze

19 x 14.5 x 11.5 inches

190418

Blueberry Boat

Blueberry Boat

Bronze

5.5 x 48 x 6 inches

180010

Button Up

Button Up

Bronze

30 x 13 x 13 inches

140082

Leslie Ortiz


Education

Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten

Boston University, School for the Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, BFA Magna Cum Laude in sculpture.


Awards

The F.C.Uriot Prize, Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam, Holland. Awarded tuition and workshop fellowships, and The Laura Goldenberg Memorial Scholarship, Boston University.


Luis Montoya

Education

School of Fine Arts of San Fernando, Madrid, Spain, BFA, MFA.

Castellblach Foundation Independent Study in Florence, London, New York.

Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, Post-graduate studies in sculpture.


Awards

1991  33rd Annual Hortt Memorial Competition, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

1986  28th Annual Hortt Memorial Competition, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

1976  James J. Akston Foundation Award.

1971  Francisco Alcantra Award, Spain.


Special Commissions

1999 The Society of Four Arts, Palm Beach, FL

1994 Palm Beach International Airport, West Palm Beach, FL

           Esperante Building, West Palm Beach, FL

1993 Tokyo/Fuji Art Museum Tokyo, Japan

1991 Sofia University, Tokyo, Japan

1990 Forest Ridge, Fort Lauderdale, FL

1989 Phillips Point, West Palm Beach, FL


Public Collections

National Museum of Sculpture, Valladolid, Spain

Circle of Fine Arts, Madrid, Spain

Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL

Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton, FL

The Society of Four Arts, Palm Beach, FL

Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, Green Bay, WI

Charles A. Wustum Museum of Fine Art, Racine, WI


Selected Exhibitions

2019 Art Market San Francisco, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

           SCOPE Miami, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

           Caldwell Snyder Gallery, St. Helena

2018 35th Anniversary Show, Caldwell Snyder Gallery, San Francisco

2018 Caldwell Snyder Gallery, St. Helena, CA

2014 Caldwell Snyder Gallery, St. Helena, CA

2009 Art Miami, Caldwell Snyder Gallery, Miami, FL

2007 Caldwell Snyder Gallery, St. Helena, CA

           Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, FL

2005 Caldwell Snyder Gallery, San Francisco, CA

           Trajan Gallery, Carmel, CA

2004 Edgewood Orchard Gallery, Fish Creek, WI

           Hawk Gallery, Columbus, OH

           Caldwell Snyder Gallery, San Francisco, CA

           Trajan Gallery, Carmel, CA

           Gerald Peters Fine Art, Dallas, TX

           Galerie Guillon-Laffaille, Paris, France

2003 SOFA Chicago, Hawk Gallery, Columbus, OH

           Hooks-Epstein Galleries, Houston, TX

           Ameringer & Yohe Fine Art, Boca Raton, FL

           San Francisco Art Fair, Caldwell Snyder, San Francisco, CA

           ARTPalm Beach, Ameringer & Yohe Fine Art, Boca Raton, FL

           San Francisco Art Fair, Caldwell Snyder, San Francisco, CA

           ARTChicago, Waddington & Tribby, Boca Raton, FL

2002 ARTMiami, Waddinton & Tribby, Boca Raton, FL

           Pillsbury Peters Fine Art, Dallas, TX

           ARTPalm Beach, Waddington & Tribby, Boca Raton, FL

           Caldwell Snyder Gallery, San Francisco, CA

2001 Gallery Henoch, New York, NY

           Waddington & Tribby, Boca Raton, FL

Biography

Luis and Leslie’s recent bronzes, as beautiful as ever, are strictly faithful representations of a marine fauna of mollusks, seashells, snails, clams, shrimps, prawns, and other crustaceans. Are we before another of Borges’ Pierre Menards re-writing Don Quixote word by word exactly as the original creator wrote it? Or are we now, as I believe, in the other end of the spectrum? At a place where we have life reverting back to the mineral world. A world of slimy primordial life secreting saliva of calcium carbonate yearning to go back to our metallic origins; billions of years of clams discarding skeletons to add one more layer of limestone and lift one more mountain range; or a coral adding one more branch to surface an island in the middle of the ocean. In the Universe form is in a constant flow of changes and transmutations: rocks melt and liquids solidify; light becomes matter, matter reverts light; life petrifies time, and time becomes rock to become life again billions of years later. A petrified forest is a calendar, but it was a cascade of light and water before, or as the Mexican poet Octavio Paz saw it, the agave is water and its thorns imitate the sea urchin and both are time petrified. Creation is an eternal close cycle of life, matter, and time. And the artists have seen that the sullen persistent mollusk that stubbornly ponders its geometry lesson of secreted coils or the spiral curves generated on a sea snail came up—billions of years before the Greeks – with the mathematical equation that graphs the tides, the movement of the waves or the orbits of the galaxies. Charting their helicoidal graphs, the mollusks found the formula to petrify time, to give it plastic consistency.

With their new bronzes, these two artists, perhaps unconsciously, are expanding the conceptual core that sustains their work. If in their vegetable universe metal and colors were perceived as luscious soft flesh, in their current work, the hidden defenseless animal has learned how to encapsulate itself with protective shells and metallic plates very much like our old Venetian friend Bartolomeo Colleoni. The inter-textual relationship that the bronze Birth of Venus (2005) establishes with Botticcelli’s masterpiece at the Uffizi is perhaps the best illustration of all this in the questions it opens. In the painting the sensual naked body of the goddess is as if the mollusk where she stands had encapsulated her, layer after layer of mother-of-pearl into a beautiful crystal of organic origin: a pearl. It brought to the world the light of human reason and pagan love. In the bronze sculpture we are discussing, the closed clams recall that the same gestation could be taking place. That the clam is ready to bloom into a lustful goddess. Or has the process somehow gone terribly wrong? The larger clam stands in a precarious balance upon the smaller clam. Has Venus returned to its original form? Are the valves the protective plates of something our times could not nourish? The clams are as lustful, if not more than the soft skin of the goddess of love. Is there irony or an obscene pun in all this? There are many linguistic connotations that come to mind. And perhaps all their bronzes are also metaphors for sculpture itself. Many more questions could be asked. Isn’t that the main function of art? To conclude, it is obvious that Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz have undergone an inner journey of reflection, reassessment and transformation of an art form they know very well. At this stage of their evolution they have discovered that time is not a frontal attack on the human spirit; something that we can abolish or should fight back by adding more plates to our protective armor. Creation is not an open-ended process, but an infinite cycle of transformations and time is the engine that allows the whole process to keep on going.

Montoya & Ortiz

Press

Montoya & Ortiz

The partnership of Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz explores both the figure and common elements found in nature. Through their sculptural guidance and subtle changes in scale the viewer ponders what makes color and form a visual feast. What makes the shell of a shrimp or an egg so compelling or why is a stuffed olive so rich in color and shape? Why is the incongruous pairing of a colossal pepper held by the figure of a seemingly fragile man straining under the weight of nature's abundance cause for contemplation? The answer lies in the exploration of the innate elegance of familiar forms.

SAN FRANCISCO

UNION SQUARE

 

341 Sutter Street
San Francisco, California 94108

Monday - Saturday, 11am - 5pm

Sunday by appointment 

415.392.2299

ST. HELENA

NAPA VALLEY

 

1328 Main Street
St. Helena, California 94574

Monday - Saturday, 10am - 5pm

Sunday 11am - 5pm

707.200.5050

MONTECITO

SANTA BARBARA

 

1266 Coast Village Road
Santa Barbara, California 93108

Monday, Thursday - Saturday, 10am - 5pm

Sunday, 11am - 5pm

Tuesday - Wednesday by Appointment

805.770.7170

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